See all of the rental gear we can ship to you for your trip!

On your next trip to Zion National Park, escape the crowds of the lodges and enjoy the outdoors as it was meant to be - either camping in a nearby campground or backpacking into the wilderness. When you rent our backpacking or camping gear, you'll see how much money you can save by renting rather than buying. Rental of backpacking and camping gear for Zion National Park is easy; just click on the "Rent Online" tab above to get started. You can rent tents, backpacks, sleeping bags, hydration gear, lights, SPOT GPS trackers - anything you need for a wonderful outdoor experience. We also have new gear for sale as well as any supplies and accessories you might need for your national park adventure.

We'll ship your rented outdoor equipment direct to your home before your trip, or to a convenient location inside the park or near the entrance to Zion National Park. On your way back home, just load the backpacking or camping gear back into the same box we shipped to you, use the prepaid return label, and drop off the rental gear at the most convenient shipping point used by our carrier - there will be many options in every city in the US.

Here's some information you may find useful before your trip:

Zion National Park is located in the Southwestern United States, near Springdale, Utah. A prominent feature of the 229 square miles (590 km2) park is Zion Canyon, which is 15 miles (24 km) long and up to half a mile (800 m) deep, cut through the reddish and tan-colored Navajo Sandstone by the North Fork of the Virgin River. The lowest elevation is 3,666 ft (1,117 m) at Coalpits Wash and the highest elevation is 8,726 ft (2,660 m) at Horse Ranch Mountain. Located at the junction of the Colorado Plateau, Great Basin, and Mojave Desert regions, the park's unique geography and variety of life zones allow for unusual plant and animal diversity. Numerous plant species as well as 289 species of birds, 75 mammals (including 19 species of bat), and 32 reptiles inhabit the park's four life zones: desert, riparian, woodland, and coniferous forest. Zion National Park includes mountains, canyons, buttes, mesas, monoliths, rivers, slot canyons, and natural arches.

In many places within Zion National Park there may not be any cell phone service. To stay in touch with friends and family no matter where you travel, consider renting one of our InReach Satellite Communicators.

Human habitation of the area started about 8,000 years ago with small family groups of Native Americans; the semi-nomadic Basketmaker Anasazi (300 CE) stem from one of these groups. In turn, the Virgin Anasazi culture (500 CE) developed as the Basketmakers settled in permanent communities. A different group, the Parowan Fremont, lived in the area as well. Both groups moved away by 1300 and were replaced by the Parrusits and several other Southern Paiute subtribes. The canyon was discovered by Mormons in 1858 and was settled by that same group in the early 1860s. In 1909, U.S. President William Howard Taft named the area a National Monument to protect the canyon, under the name of Mukuntuweap National Monument. In 1918, however, the acting director of the newly created National Park Service changed the park's name to Zion as the original name was locally unpopular. Zion is one of the names of Jerusalem in ancient Hebrew. The United States Congress established the monument as a National Park on November 19, 1919. The Kolob section was proclaimed a separate Zion National Monument in 1937, but was incorporated into the park in 1956.

If you are interested in renting gear for camping or backpacking in or around any national park, just give us a call at (480-348-8917) or browse our rental gear above.

The geology of the Zion and Kolob canyons area includes 9 formations that together represent 150 million years of mostly Mesozoic-aged sedimentation. At various periods in that time warm, shallow seas, streams, ponds and lakes, vast deserts, and dry near-shore environments covered the area. Uplift associated with the creation of the Colorado Plateaus lifted the region 10,000 feet (3,000 m) starting 13 million years ago.

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