See all of the rental gear we can ship to you for your trip!

On your next trip to Death Valley National Park, escape the crowds of the lodges or nearby hotels and enjoy the outdoors as it was meant to be - either camping in a nearby campground or backpacking into the wilderness. When you rent our backpacking or camping gear, you'll see how much money you can save by renting rather than buying. Rental of backpacking and camping gear for Death Valley National Park is easy; just click on the "Rent Online" tab above to get started. You can rent tents, backpacks, sleeping bags, hydration gear, lights, SPOT GPS trackers - anything you need for a wonderful outdoor experience. We also have new gear for sale as well as any supplies and accessories you might need for your national park adventure.

We'll ship your rented outdoor equipment direct to your home before your trip, or to a convenient location inside the park or near the entrance to Death Valley National Park. On your way back home, just load the backpacking or camping gear back into the same box we shipped to you, use the prepaid return label, and drop off the rental gear at the most convenient shipping point used by our carrier - there will be many options in every city in the US.

Here's some information you may find useful before your trip:

Death Valley National Park is a national park located east of the Sierra Nevada in the arid Great Basin of the United States. Parts of the park are in southern Inyo County and northern San Bernardino County in Eastern California, with a small extension into southwestern Nye County and extreme southern Esmeralda County in Nevada. In addition, there is an exclave (Devil's Hole) in southern Nye County. The park covers 5,262 square miles (13,630 km2), encompassing Saline Valley, a large part of Panamint Valley, almost all of Death Valley, and parts of several mountain ranges. Death Valley National Monument was declared a U.S. National Monument in 1933, placing the area under federal protection. In 1994, the monument was redesignated a national park, as well as being substantially expanded to include Saline and Eureka valleys.

In many places within Death Valley National Park there may not be any cell phone service. To stay in touch with friends and family no matter where you travel, consider renting one of our InReach Satellite Communicators.

It is the hottest and driest of the national parks in the United States. The second-lowest point in the Western Hemisphere is in Badwater Basin, which is 282 feet (86 m) below sea level. The park is home to many species of plants and animals that have adapted to this harsh desert environment. Some examples include creosote bush, Bighorn Sheep, Coyote, and the Death Valley Pupfish, a survivor of much wetter times. Approximately 95% of the park is designated as wilderness. Its wilderness area covers 4,774 square miles (12,360 km2), making it the largest in the Lower 48 states, and the sixth largest in the United States overall. Death Valley National Park is visited annually by more than 770,000 visitors who come to see its diverse geologic features, desert wildlife, historic sites, scenery, and clear night skies.

If you are interested in renting gear for camping or backpacking in or around any national park, just give us a call at (480-348-8917) or browse our rental gear above.

The natural environment of the area has been shaped largely by its geology. The valley itself is actually a graben. The oldest rocks are extensively metamorphosed and at least 1.7 billion years old. Ancient warm, shallow seas deposited marine sediments until rifting opened the Pacific Ocean. Additional sedimentation occurred until a subduction zone formed off the coast. This uplifted the region out of the sea and created a line of volcanoes. Later the crust started to pull apart, creating the current Basin and Range landform. Valleys filled with sediment and, during the wet times of glacial periods, with lakes, such as Lake Manly.

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