See all of the rental gear we can ship to you for your trip!

On your next trip to Arches National Park, escape the crowds of the lodges or nearby hotels and enjoy the outdoors as it was meant to be - either camping in a nearby campground or backpacking into the wilderness. When you rent our backpacking or camping gear, you'll see how much money you can save by renting rather than buying. Rental of backpacking and camping gear for Arches National Park is easy; just click on the "Rent Online" tab above to get started. You can rent tents, backpacks, sleeping bags, hydration gear, lights, SPOT GPS trackers - anything you need for a wonderful outdoor experience. We also have new gear for sale as well as any supplies and accessories you might need for your national park adventure.

We'll ship your rented outdoor equipment direct to your home before your trip, or to a convenient location inside the park or near the entrance to Arches National Park. On your way back home, just load the backpacking or camping gear back into the same box we shipped to you, use the prepaid return label, and drop off the rental at our carrier's closest shipping point.

Here's some information you may find useful before your trip:

Arches National Park is a U.S. National Park in eastern Utah. It is known for preserving over 2000 natural sandstone arches, including the world-famous Delicate Arch, in addition to a variety of unique geological resources and formations.The park is located just outside of Moab, Utah, and is 119 square miles (310 km2) in size. Its highest elevation is 5,653 feet (1,723 m) at Elephant Butte, and its lowest elevation is 4,085 feet (1,245 m) at the visitor center. Forty-three arches have collapsed due to erosion since 1970. The park receives 10 inches (250 mm) of rain a year on average. Administered by the National Park Service, the area was originally designated as a National Monument on April 12, 1929. It was redesignated as a National Park on November 12, 1971.

In many places within Arches National Park there may not be any cell phone service. To stay in touch with friends and family no matter where you travel, consider renting one of our InReach Satellite Communicators.

The national park lies atop an underground evaporite layer or salt bed, which is the main cause of the formation of the arches, spires, balanced rocks, sandstone fins, and eroded monoliths in the area. This salt bed is thousands of feet thick in places, and was deposited in the Paradox Basin of the Colorado Plateau some 300 million years ago when a sea flowed into the region and eventually evaporated. Over millions of years, the salt bed was covered with debris eroded from the Uncompahgre Uplift to the northeast. During the Early Jurassic (about 210 Ma) desert conditions prevailed in the region and the vast Navajo Sandstone was deposited. An additional sequence of stream laid and windblown sediments, the Entrada Sandstone (about 140 Ma), was deposited on top of the Navajo. Over 5000 feet (1500 m) of younger sediments were deposited and have been mostly eroded away. Remnants of the cover exist in the area including exposures of the Cretaceous Mancos Shale. The arches of the area are developed mostly within the Entrada formation.

If you are interested in renting gear for camping or backpacking in or around any national park, just give us a call at (480-348-8917) or browse our rental gear above.

The weight of this cover caused the salt bed below it to liquefy and thrust up layers of rock into salt domes. The evaporites of the area formed more unusual salt anticlines or linear regions of uplift. Faulting occurred and whole sections of rock subsided into the areas between the domes. In some places, they turned almost on edge. The result of one such 2,500-foot (760 m) displacement, the Moab Fault, is seen from the visitor center.

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